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Does Your Teen Have Schizophrenia?

“Why can’t you see it?” the schizophrenic asks his mother in disbelief. “You see it, don’t you mom? It is circling all around you.” The nineteen-year-old son raises his hands above his head in rage. “Mom, watch out!” the son said with a lack of breath, “It is going to strike you!”

Immediately after, the son tackled his mother trying to save her from being shot by a criminal. After he saw his mother dripping blood from the top of her head, he realized the criminal dressed in black was a hallucination.

Although the story is fictional, similar instances occur on a daily basis. Schizophrenia, a psychological disorder of the brain, not only affects the diagnosed individual, but also puts others in danger from the chemical imbalances of schizophrenia.

Answers for the psychological disorder are still unknown, but theories are still being thrown out left and right on a yearly basis. Today, “there are at least as many individuals with schizophrenia homeless and living on the streets as there are in hospitals and related facilities,” (Fuller 1).
Theories behind the madness suggest that it is the families that provide a schizophrenic’s outburst.
With that being said, how would a teen with schizophrenia be able to handle their outbursts if they are A. Not being treated or B. living in an environment where outbursts fabricate? The answer is simple; that is, to provide the teen with outside help.

Fortunately, there are a variety of schools with professionals that can help to reduce the amount of outbreaks a teen may encounter. New Creations Boarding school in Richmond, Indiana, offers troubled teens insight to a new environment with professional guiding hands. Employees and faculty at New Creations have the qualifications to handle students with psychological disorders, and offer 24/7 supervision in case of any outburst.

For hundreds of years, scientists have been trying to figure out the explanation behind schizophrenia. Thus far, statistics have shown that those living in urban areas are two times likely to develop schizophrenia than rural areas (Fuller 12). Statistics have also shown that people living in Northern states are more likely to be diagnosed with the disorder than those living in Southern states (Fuller 12).
Since the 1970s, psychologists believed that the reason behind the evidence derives from a lack of attention in the schizophrenic’s childhood (McFarlane 1). With daily devotions and endless support, New Creations is ideal for most teens diagnosed with the disorder. Within such boarding school, all students are created equally.

An English research team figured out that schizophrenics are more likely to relapse if he or she is treated differently than others (McFarlane 1).Still, many families do not understand how to deal with the schizophrenic, especially if sympathy provides more damage than good. Commonly, those diagnosed with schizophrenia want to be treated equally rather than sympathetically.

In order to prevent schizophrenic outbursts of crime and harm, the origin of the disorder needs to be studied more in depth. If your teen is diagnosed with schizophrenia and you don’t know what to do, I’d personally like to recommend going to www.newcreationsboardingschool.org for additional assistance.

 

Works Cited

Davies, Lisa. “Sorry I Butchered my family”. The Sidney Daily Telegraph. 16 August 2002.

Fuller, Edwin T. M.D. “Surviving Schizophrenia: A Manual for Families, Consumers, and Providers”. New York: HarperCollins, 2001.

McFarlane, William R. “Families in the Treatment of Psychotic Disorders.” Harvard Mental Health Letter.

Rimer, Sara. “Mentally Ill Homeless Gain in Project”. New York Times.

Sartorius, Norman. “Stigma: What can Psychiatrists do About it?”. Lancet.

 

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