Trimming the House–Got Tools?

Certain jobs either require certain tools or make life miserable if you don’t have those certain tools. Installing trim is one of those jobs.

For example, if you don’t have a compound mitre saw, at least, life can be pretty rough as you’re starting to put in the trim. With the angles necessary for a smooth flow of baseboard, chair rail, or crown molding, 45-degree cuts are common, and some of the deeper, wider, bigger trim requires some fancy work, in order to have it fit well, once everything is up on the wall (or down on the wall, as the case may be).

Another tool that makes house-trimming life a whole lot more pleasant is a nail gun designed for the little nails that are just right for trim. Hammering in all the necessary trim nails, individually, manually, … makes installing trim rather tedious, to say the least. Especially if you’re doing more than just a little section, the nail gun may be something of a life saver, in the long run as well as in the short run. One comment about this tool is that it’s wise to get a quick release for the air hose, to be able to detach the nail gun quickly.

Depending on what kind of trim you’re hanging and where it is ultimately headed, a level may or may not be necessary, to be sure the trim really is installed both correctly and safely. The longer the run of trim, the more a longer level will come in handy, although a short level, used correctly, should work, if a longer level just is not an option. Sometimes, granted, the walls and/or floors are so extremely not level that to have the trim level would look bizarre. There are times when it’s better to install trim so it looks right, rather than installing it so it is right (i.e., “level”).

Not everybody has all these tools, and even some of those who do have them don’t really know how to use them. Just because someone doesn’t have all the specialty tools doesn’t mean he (or she) should give up in despair! After all, the tools don’t make or break the project (They don’t even really “make the man”!), but they sure can make it a whole lot easier, or, by their absence, make it a whole lot harder.

For people who don’t have the tools or the motivation to struggle through a project without them, there are companies like D.R. Hartman Construction, Inc. (DRHCI), a general contractor based in Bethesda, Maryland. If you’re working on renovating your home, and you need some help with part or all of it, consider contacting D.R. Hartman Construction, Inc. for a free, no-obligation quote.

D.R. Hartman Construction, Inc. focuses on customer service, both for new bathrooms in Potomac and for renovated kitchens in Rockville. If you have a project that is just a little more than you want to tackle, whether because of a lack of the right tools or a lack of confidence or even just a lack of time, check out this family company for a quote and some ideas on how to proceed or maybe just where to start.

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